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UV Light—Slicing and Dicing the Light That Can’t Be Seen

ultravioletlight2Several years ago, scientists hypothesized that a narrow spectrum of ultraviolet light called far-UVC could kill microbes without damaging healthy tissue. Far-UVC light at about 222 nanometers (nm) has a very limited range and cannot penetrate through the outer dead-cell layer of human skin or the tear layer in the eye, so it’s not a human health hazard. But because viruses and bacteria are much smaller than human cells, far-UVC light can reach their DNA and kill them. In the study, aerosolized H1N1 virus—a common strain of flu virus—was released into a test chamber and exposed to very low doses of 222nm far-UVC light. A control group of aerosolized virus was not exposed to the UVC light. The far-UVC light efficiently inactivated the flu viruses with about the same efficiency as conventional germicidal UV light.[1] Continue reading

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The Color Project: Part Three

Part 3Parts One and Two of this series of posts on NCCA’s “The Color Project” discussed why we needed to run a visual assessment experiment and how we structured the study. You may recall that we created 54 panel pairs, and within this set there were 15 repeats (i.e., pairs that were shown to the observers—unbeknownst to them—a second time to see how closely they would rate the pairs), as well as 8 pairs of identical panels (i.e., take a panel, cut it in half, tape the halves together, and call it a color difference pair). I also mentioned the tedium of collecting data for 13 solid hours. And lastly, I teased you with promise of revealing data here in Part Three. So, without further ado, let’s dive in. But first, let’s discuss the visual observations. We’ll talk color data later. Continue reading


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Three Growing Trends in Coated Metal Color and Aesthetics

Year after year, the coated metal industry continues to innovate and inspire designers and architects with new aesthetical and color options that have reshaped consumer expectations. More than ever, buildings have the ability to stand out, while reaping the durability and environmental benefits of using prepainted metal. Here are just a few of the latest trends in coated metal that define why there’s never been a more exciting time in the industry.

1. Textured Products

Textured, painted metal products were introduced in the 1980s to expand the visual, durability and eco-friendly possibilities of incorporating these products into commercial and residential applications. Continue reading


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Benefits of Using Metal in Construction

For decades, metal roofs have been the preferred choice for architects and designers for their durability, versatility, eco-friendliness and many other factors. As the coated metal industry continues to innovate and inspire, we see an increase in the use of metal in nearly all aspects of construction, not just the roofs. Here are just some of the reasons we are seeing metal used more and more in the construction of today’s most impressive buildings.

Versatility

Coated metal today has the ability to be an endless selection of colors and can emulate a growing number of textures, including asphalt, stone, concrete, barn siding and other materials. There’s been a huge demand in the market for the application of innovative color-shifting coatings, which offer an eye-catching, bilateral color finish. With textured metal products, architects can meet client demands for visual depth and designs that differentiate them in the market and give their buildings a unique look.

Interior Capabilities Continue reading


Scattering Sunshine

There is no investment you can make which will pay you so well as the effort to scatter sunshine and good cheer through your establishment.

– Orison Swett Marden (1850-1924)

770_4665645Scattering sunshine metaphorically is a great idea. The stress of the workplace places great burdens on people and spreading a little sunshine is a simple way to create a more positive environment. But scattering sunshine also has a far less romantic side to it.

Clouds and shaving cream are white, but they do not contain any white pigment. Driving through dense fog can be treacherous, but it’s just water! Bathroom mirrors also fog, especially if you take a really hot shower on a cold winter day. And titanium dioxide is a clear crystal, yet we call it a white pigment. Scattering of light explains all.

One can discuss scattering by pointing to detailed physics formulae, but that method produces more fog than clarity. I prefer the much simpler method that assumes that the brainy physicists have worked out all the details and that they can be trusted. If that works for you (and it certainly works for me), read on. Continue reading


Color and Appearance

Source: Columbus Museum of Art Facebook

Source: Columbus Museum of Art Facebook

I recently attended a Konica Minolta seminar on color and color instrumentation, held at the Columbus Museum of Art. What a great idea, discussing the science of color in a building where color is critical and has been used to express so many concepts, ideas, and ideals. Konica Minolta holds these seminars around the country, and this one in Columbus had 50+ people in attendance.

The seminar was three-hours long, and there were two main takeaways:

  1. Color is a very complex topic.
  2. There is a big difference between color and appearance.

Many attending this seminar were from the automotive industry. Continue reading