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Science and ASTM

ASTM logoYou may think that that standards development in ASTM is a slow process—as it tends to be in most associations with volunteers. You may think ASTM-ers talk endlessly about the stickiness of tape or the problem with the precision of the pencil hardness test. Yes, there is plenty of that. There is also the development of new standards when new technology becomes established.

Anyone developing a piece of testing equipment in the paints and coatings industry—or the medical industry or the building and construction industry—can see the value of having an ASTM standard available to clarify its use and to describe its precision. While all of these things are important, I have found that ASTM is also the one association where science can “happen” most readily. Hard to believe? Read on! Continue reading


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The Next Great Thing: Part Two

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We left off last time mentioning two research reports, both of which discuss a functional material that might—someday—serve as a cooling device. No moving parts and no energy required to operate this device. Science fiction? Definitely not, but there is still much to be done before such a device becomes a commercial reality. But, for the moment, let’s not worry about such details.

At the 2015 CRRC Membership meeting, Aaswath Raman, Ph.D., from the Ginzton Laboratory at Stanford University, presented his work on sub-ambient cooling of sky-facing surfaces. To understand Dr. Raman’s work, picture a sheet of material with an exceptionally high solar reflectance (around 97%), mounted in a fixture on a roof in Phoenix. It has a shiny metal appearance. (Super-high reflectance is only possible with mirror-like materials.) Because the material has such a high reflectance, it will not absorb much incoming IR radiation, but it certainly will be heated by the surrounding hot desert air (convective heating). Since this shiny material is hot because of the desert heat, it is emitting plenty of IR radiation. Here is the actual installation. Continue reading


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The Next Great Thing: Part One

ImageforBlogPart1forwebIn the arena of university R&D, one often thinks, who cares? I certainly do. But in this and the next post, you will read about some fascinating work coming out of Stanford University. As a self-professed cynic, I would never mention “the next great thing” if I did not see some very real potential. There is, of course, a big valley between R&D and commercial reality, but from what I have heard and read … well, you be the judge.

One of these ideas that could fall into the “too good to be true” category is radiative cooling. Before you fear that I’ve taken leave of my senses, yes, I do understand that all objects radiate energy and will cool as a result. All cool-roofing codes contain an emittance requirement for this reason. Objects (such as painted metal roofing) with a high thermal emittance (>75%; a perfect emitter would be 100%) cool down faster than low-emittance materials such as shiny metal. When the sun sets, you want the roof to radiate as much heat as possible to the atmosphere as fast as possible. Of course, when the sun is beating down on the roof, you also want the roof to reflect as much heat as possible in the form of infrared radiation (IR), keeping the roof as cool as possible. That’s why both parameters—reflectance and emittance—are important in the cool-roofing arena. Continue reading


Scattering Sunshine

There is no investment you can make which will pay you so well as the effort to scatter sunshine and good cheer through your establishment.

– Orison Swett Marden (1850-1924)

770_4665645Scattering sunshine metaphorically is a great idea. The stress of the workplace places great burdens on people and spreading a little sunshine is a simple way to create a more positive environment. But scattering sunshine also has a far less romantic side to it.

Clouds and shaving cream are white, but they do not contain any white pigment. Driving through dense fog can be treacherous, but it’s just water! Bathroom mirrors also fog, especially if you take a really hot shower on a cold winter day. And titanium dioxide is a clear crystal, yet we call it a white pigment. Scattering of light explains all.

One can discuss scattering by pointing to detailed physics formulae, but that method produces more fog than clarity. I prefer the much simpler method that assumes that the brainy physicists have worked out all the details and that they can be trusted. If that works for you (and it certainly works for me), read on. Continue reading


Textured Metal Building Products Part Two: Benefits

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Image via Valspar

As discussed in Textured Metal Building Products Part One: Growing Trend, textured, prepainted metal building products are being specified and demanded more for a variety of building projects.

These products provide a wide range of benefits when it comes to building design and function, including: aesthetics, durability and environmental.

Aesthetic Benefits Continue reading


Accelerated Weathering: Part Two

Part One of this blog described some of the difficulties associated with accelerated corrosion testing. The chemistry is complex. There are many microclimates to consider. And the list goes on. There is good news, however. We are not alone. Extensive amounts of research across all coatings areas is done and reported routinely.

french-corrosion-instituteAs a Part Two blog on accelerated corrosion testing, here is a sampling of work done by the French Corrosion Institute, an organization that has done a great deal of work in the past with the European Coil Coating Association. The bullet points following the titles and attributions are my own comments from reading the documents: Continue reading


Three Benefits of Prepainted Insulated Metal Panels

insulatedmetalpanelsArchitects and building owners continue to expand the use prepainted metal  for its long-term durability, specifically its excellent  chalk, fade, and adhesion performance. The use of Insulated Metal Panels (IMPs) is also on the rise in a variety of roof and wall applications due to its sustainability and versatility. Combining the two, prepainted IMPs provide  superior energy efficiency and durability, both of which are necessary  in today’s competitive marketplace to comply with ever-evolving building codes and customer expectations.

1. Many Design Options Continue reading