COAT NOTES

We've Got You Covered


Leave a comment

Busting Coil Coating Myths: The Five Misconceptions About Prepainted Metals

If you are a manufacturer or designer, there are five common myths about coil coating or prepainted metal you might have heard. We’re going to bust those myths one by one and show you why prepainted metals are your best choice. Here are the facts.

Myth 1: Prepainted metal is expensive.

The truth is, utilizing prepainted metal saves you money by eliminating the costs associated with an in-house paint shop. When you post-paint, you have the added expense of labor, materials, scrap, and inventory. Plus, there are numerous costs (and headaches) when you’re dealing with EPA and OSHA compliance. It can cost big bucks to make sure you’re properly handling waste, emissions, and cleanups. In addition, storing paint in your facility can cost you in higher insurance premiums. To determine whether prepaint is for you, download the cost analysis form under Education on the NCCA website.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

On the Road with Prepaint

Prepainted metal is all around us. You are probably familiar with its many uses in the building and construction and appliance markets, but you may not be aware that prepainted metal is also important in the transportation sector.

Think “transportation,” and your mind typically leaps to cars and trucks—and from there to the beautiful body panels that are an aesthetically important part of these vehicles. Spoiler alert: Painted automotive body panels require specialized coatings and application techniques and, as a result, are not ideally suited to the use of prepainted metal. Nonetheless, there are plenty examples of coil-processed material used in the transportation sector.

Continue reading


4 Comments

Decking Out Your House with Prepainted Metals: Using Prepainted Steel and Aluminum from Top to Bottom

Urban legends are, well, false—but still fun, because there is always something believable about them. Is it true that you are never more than six feet away from a spider? Who really knows, and some might say who really cares? But let’s face it—don’t you find yourself wondering, “Hmmm, I wonder if it’s true, and should I be calling an exterminator?” Well, here’s something that is not a legend: You would be surprised to learn how many articles in your home, just feet away from you, are made from prepainted metal.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Coatings Technology: Learning to Accommodate the Local Weather

We’ll confine our discussion here to obvious weather differences, but we won’t get into how coil coatings formulators accommodate those differences. That’s a discussion for another day. Just know that steel and aluminum companies, pretreatment suppliers, and coatings chemists are working hard to formulate a coil coating system that provides the necessary performance for a particular region.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Market Disruption: Metal Residential Roofing

Sustainability, upcycling, downcycling, landfills … the list goes on! What is one to think when every material is touted as sustainable? Don’t believe me? Visit any material website; for example, cement/concrete, vinyl plastic, wood building products. What is one to make of all these claims—are they real? How does our industry fit in?

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Effects

We begin with two strange words, which in some ways are opposites—and in other ways are similar.

Welcome to the fascinating world of wetting.

First, let’s keep this simple. Let’s only think about water—as opposed to oily materials—that is deposited onto coatings, windows, mirrors, the leaves of plants, etc. The water (in the form of rain, steam, fog, etc.) may form droplets on the surface, or it may spread into a thin film. A hydrophobic substrate causes the water to form droplets; a hydrophilic coating, however, causes the water to spread into a thin film. But how do you keep these two terms straight, given that they sound so similar? Continue reading


Leave a comment

Let’s Reroof Your House

image001I know you had a 30-year warranty, but—after 15 years—those shingles simply must be replaced. Anyone can call a roofer, but why not take a shot at making your own shingles? But first you need a formulation—the recipe—and I’ve got just the one for you. And while we’re at it, let’s compare shingle manufacturing to metal roofing manufacturing.

Continue reading