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NCCA Color Experiment at NCCA’s Fall Meeting and METALCON 2017

NCCA has been investigating an alternative method for color measurement for the coil coating industry. As part of this investigation, NCCA is coordinating a visual assessment experiment. In a nutshell, we are attempting to assess the human response to slight color differences between pairs of panels and to correlate that response to a color instrument’s reading. Of course, people see color and color differences differently, and color instruments have a host of setup options from which to choose, so this is hardly a straightforward experiment. But if it were simple, it would have been done decades ago. Continue reading

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NCCA to Present at the22nd Galvanizing and Coil Coating Conference, September 12-13, 2017


NCCA Technical Director David Cocuzzi is scheduled to present a paper and conduct a 1.5-hour seminar on prepainted metal at the Galvanizing and Coil Coating Conference to be held September 12-13, 2017, in Abu Dhabi.

This area of the Middle East (Saudi Arabia, UAE, etc.) has experienced a surge in development over the last few decades. It’s easy to assume that oil revenue explains it all, and we know that a lot of money is being spent to build towers and islands, so why bother talking about coil coating? As these economies develop, each country has to grapple with their own unique set of conditions, not the least of which is that they cannot depend on an endless supply of oil. Each country must look to branch out into other areas of business that make the most sense for their economy while also studying what other global economies are doing. Continue reading


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Tips for Prepainted Metal Maintenance

For most buildings, the exterior is designed to be its most important eye-catching feature. While we’re wired to be extra mindful of the cleanliness and maintenance of the interior of our homes and offices, we sometimes neglect to remember to give the outside of our buildings the proper care. One of the biggest advantages of prepainted metal is its easy maintenance, but there are a few easy steps to make your metal panels shine bright.

Rinse the surface with water.

This sounds like a no-brainer, but this is one of the easiest ways to clean coated metal panels. Dirt and debris built up over time can affect the quality of the panel’s appearance and potentially reduce the lifetime of the coating. Simply rinsing the surface with a garden hose or pressure spray system will clean most buildups on a coating surface, allowing the panels to look brand new.

Clean with soap or water for difficult areas.

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Whatever Happened to … Acid Rain?

Air emissions and global warmingThis is the first in a series of posts under the general heading, “Whatever Happened to … ?” The idea is to revisit issues and opportunities of the past and help bring you up to date on what has been accomplished and what is still yet to be done. So … whatever happened to acid rain?

As it pertains to the prepainted metal market, and especially to metal roofing, acid rain became an accepted and understood phenomenon in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Badly corroded roofs were becoming more prevalent, but—like any new problem—it took some time to identify the root cause and to learn how to overcome the issue of red rusting on roofs. And, as with any root cause analysis, an early root cause declaration is usually challenged. Then more research is done, more challenges are raised, and, eventually, consensus is reached. Continue reading


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When “Just Right” Means “Uh-Oh”

nccaA while back, I wrote about the “just right” conditions necessary for the formation of fog. That particular post discussed the scattering of light, which is done by materials such as titanium dioxide (the principal pigment in white paint) and clouds (where water droplets do the scattering). The birds are chirping at sunrise and the vernal equinox has already passed, which means the sun is finally in the Northern Hemisphere and the days are getting longer and warmer—and all of this points to the beginning of another building season. That got me to thinking about a few other “just right” conditions that seem pertinent for this time of year. And, once again, water comes into play. Continue reading


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Science and ASTM

ASTM logoYou may think that that standards development in ASTM is a slow process—as it tends to be in most associations with volunteers. You may think ASTM-ers talk endlessly about the stickiness of tape or the problem with the precision of the pencil hardness test. Yes, there is plenty of that. There is also the development of new standards when new technology becomes established.

Anyone developing a piece of testing equipment in the paints and coatings industry—or the medical industry or the building and construction industry—can see the value of having an ASTM standard available to clarify its use and to describe its precision. While all of these things are important, I have found that ASTM is also the one association where science can “happen” most readily. Hard to believe? Read on! Continue reading


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The Next Great Thing: Part Two

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We left off last time mentioning two research reports, both of which discuss a functional material that might—someday—serve as a cooling device. No moving parts and no energy required to operate this device. Science fiction? Definitely not, but there is still much to be done before such a device becomes a commercial reality. But, for the moment, let’s not worry about such details.

At the 2015 CRRC Membership meeting, Aaswath Raman, Ph.D., from the Ginzton Laboratory at Stanford University, presented his work on sub-ambient cooling of sky-facing surfaces. To understand Dr. Raman’s work, picture a sheet of material with an exceptionally high solar reflectance (around 97%), mounted in a fixture on a roof in Phoenix. It has a shiny metal appearance. (Super-high reflectance is only possible with mirror-like materials.) Because the material has such a high reflectance, it will not absorb much incoming IR radiation, but it certainly will be heated by the surrounding hot desert air (convective heating). Since this shiny material is hot because of the desert heat, it is emitting plenty of IR radiation. Here is the actual installation. Continue reading