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The Color Project: Part Six

Part6Thanks for sticking with us—this is the sixth and final post about the NCCA Color Project experiment we conducted at METALCON. In the previous five posts, we presented our analyses of the 28 observers’ ratings to see how discerning and consistent they were. We concluded that human observers see color differences differently; some see a lot of difference, some just a little. This was not unexpected. Finally, it’s time to look at the observed color differences plotted against the machine readings for color difference.

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The Color Project: Part Five

 

Part5Let’s quickly review the previous two posts on NCCA’s “The Color Project”:

  • In Part Three, we showed that about 20% of our observers fell into an “extremes” category (i.e., they were either notably far less critical or far more critical); but the majority—80%—of the observers were more or less in agreement.
  • In Part Four, we concluded that most of the people, most of the time, were not fooled by the identical-pair panels. Only 9% of the time were there notable color differences declared, and half of the observers saw no difference at all. If you expect to see a color difference, by golly, you will!

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The Color Project: Part Four

Part 4In Part Three of “The Color Project” blog post series, we began to discuss the vast amount of data collected from the NCCA color experiment at METALCON. We also looked at how each individual observer compared to the other observers. We found that about 20% fell into an “extreme” category (i.e., they were notably far less critical or far more critical), but the majority—80%—of the observers were more or less in agreement.

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NCCA Color Experiment at NCCA’s Fall Meeting and METALCON 2017

NCCA has been investigating an alternative method for color measurement for the coil coating industry. As part of this investigation, NCCA is coordinating a visual assessment experiment. In a nutshell, we are attempting to assess the human response to slight color differences between pairs of panels and to correlate that response to a color instrument’s reading. Of course, people see color and color differences differently, and color instruments have a host of setup options from which to choose, so this is hardly a straightforward experiment. But if it were simple, it would have been done decades ago. Continue reading